Protect Your Cat With Reduced Cost Vaccination

in Cat
May 2011 is National Vaccination Month, the ideal time to restore your cat's protection against the most important infectious diseases. During National Vaccination Month participating vets will give your dog a full primary course of vaccination for the price of a booster, plus a free health check.
Your dog must be over 18 months of age and must not have been vaccinated within the last 18 months.

The threat of disease. If your cat hasn't been vaccinated in the last 18 months, its immunity to any or all of the diseases on this page may have lapsed. These are dangerous, unpleasant diseases, as owners here testify. So please use the opportunity of National Vaccination Month to restore your cat's protection in full.

Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) is associated with the occurrence of tumours and anaemia in cats but also causes disease by suppressing the cat's immune system. This leaves the cat susceptible to a variety of other problems, which may then be more serious as the cat is unable to combat disease effectively. This is similar to the problems seen in man with the AIDS virus and in cats with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV). There is no treatment to eliminate a FeLV infection, although interferons are now being used in an attempt to eliminate disease in some cases. Treatment must therefore be aimed at maintaining quality of life and managing the effects of infection such as immunosuppression, anaemia and cancer.

Feline panleucopaenia is a very serious disease of cats which carries a high risk of mortality especially in young cats and kittens. The virus is very similar to the one that causes parvovirus in dogs and indeed recent parvovirus strains of dogs have been show to infect cats and cause feline panleucopaenia. Treatment is typically supportive often including intravenous fluids and antibiotics. Without intensive nursing, many cats can die from the effects of the disease.

Cat 'flu remains a depressingly common experience, despite the important contribution made by vaccines. The disease can vary in severity, but kittens are particularly at risk and entire litters have been known to die soon after contracting it. Feline herpesvirus (FHV) - Although the majority of cats infected make a full recovery, this often takes several weeks and some cats are left with permanent effects of infection such as recurrent eye problems and chronic rhinitis (inflammation of the nose). Cats with chronic rhinitis are usually well in themselves but have a persistent discharge from the nose. Secondary bacterial infection of damaged tissue can cause chronic conjunctivitis, sinusitis and bronchitis (inflammation of the linings of the eyes, sinuses and air passages). Antibiotic treatment usually only provides temporary relief of these symptoms.
Herpes carriers may come down with cat 'flu (clinical signs and viral shedding) following stressful events, like staying in a cattery, many months after first catching the disease.

Feline calcivirus (FCV) - Infection usually causes a milder form of cat 'flu with less dramatic nasal discharges. Characteristic mouth ulcers are sometimes the only sign of infection. The ulcers may be present on the tongue, on the roof of the mouth or the nose. Some strains of FCV cause lameness and fever in young kittens. Affected cats recover over a few days although they may benefit from pain killers at this time.
Calicivirus carrier cats shed virus continually with most cats eventually becoming carriers, but some are persistently-infected - sometimes this is associated with mouth inflammation (gingivostomatitis).
Feline calcivirus (FCV) - Infection usually causes a milder form of cat 'flu with less dramatic nasal discharges. Characteristic mouth ulcers are sometimes the only sign of infection. The ulcers may be present on the tongue, on the roof of the mouth or the nose. Some strains of FCV cause lameness and fever in young kittens. Affected cats recover over a few days although they may benefit from pain killers at this time.

Calicivirus carrier cats shed virus continually with most cats eventually becoming carriers, but some are persistently-infected - sometimes this is associated with mouth inflammation (gingivostomatitis).

Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bb) - This infectious bacterium is more commonly known as the most important cause of canine infectious tracheobronchitis (Kennel Cough). However, this bacteria also causes respiratory signs in cats that can be hard to differentiate from cat 'flu caused by viral infections. Bordetella can be a particular threat to young kittens and occasionally whole litters of kittens may be lost to this infection.
Cats that recover from cat 'flu are often unable to completely eliminate the viruses or bacteria from their body and many become "carriers", able to transmit the disease to other cats for years. Don't delay remember vaccination month in May.
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Sabina Kucz has 1 articles online


National Vaccination Month, Vaccination Month

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This article was published on 2011/03/31